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Easton, Connecticut | “Black Pearl of Fairfield County”

Love New England for its farms, landscapes, antique homes, stone walls, winding roads, and mature trees? Plan a visit to charming Easton, Connecticut.

4.23 avg. rating (84% score) - 21 votes

The bucolic and sleepy town once described in a New York Times article as the “black pearl of Fairfield County” is situated just past the Merritt Parkway, next to Fairfield, Weston, Monroe, Trumbull, Newtown and Redding. Dreamy images of its farms and landscapes, antique homes, stone walls, winding roads, and mature trees conjure up images by Constable and the words of Emerson and Thoreau.

Much of quiet, bucolic Easton, including the architecture, remains unchanged from the Colonial days.

Much of quiet, bucolic Easton, including the architecture, remains unchanged from the Colonial days.

Jessica Gordon Ryan

First settled in 1757, Easton, along with neighboring Weston, was originally part of the town of Fairfield. Weston incorporated out in 1787, followed by Easton in 1845. Today Easton, which is on the National Register of Historic Places, remains relatively unchanged. There are no streetlights, malls or mainstream shopping. There is no grocery store. Blink once and you’ll miss the town center, which consists of a gas station that predates World War II and the Easton General Store, where you can pick up sundries and some of the best deli sandwiches around.

Across the street is the Easton Fire Station, where every August a carnival is hosted by the fire department. This is small town living at its best, where neighbors from Easton and surrounding towns come out to participate in the summer’s most anticipated event. To the outsider looking in, the scene is reminiscent of the carefree days of a bygone era.

Farming remains Easton's main form of industry. Silverman's Farm becomes a tourist attraction during the fall where people from across the state and from neighboring states come to pick the apples and pumpkins.

Farming remains Easton’s main form of industry. Silverman’s Farm becomes a tourist attraction during the fall where people from across the state and from neighboring states come to pick the apples and pumpkins.

Jessica Gordon Ryan

Just beyond is Silverman’s Farm, perhaps the area’s most celebrated autumn attraction. The farm has is known for its apple- and pumpkin-picking while the area’s trees are at peak color, attracting visitors from Connecticut, New York, New Jersey and beyond. A tractor pulls young and old apple pickers alike on a steep and windy path to the top of the hill where all marvel at the breathtaking views below. A stop in the store is a must. While their apple cider and donuts are great, this insider encourages all to pick up one of their delicious pies (or two, or more!). Across Sport Hill Road (Route 59), young ones delight in Silverman’s petting farm.

Across the orchard is a delightful petting farm - A favorite of kids of all ages.

Across the orchard is a delightful petting farm – A favorite of kids of all ages.

Jessica Gordon Ryan

Further up Route 59 is Sport Hill Farm, a relative newcomer. Here customers can pick up a wide variety of seasonal produce, eggs, dairy and some meat products. Sport Hill Farm supplies many of Fairfield County’s most prestigious restaurants. A little further up the road is Snow’s Farm, which specializes in gardening products and lawn care and has been around for more than 100 years.

The Union Cemetery is believed to be the most haunted in the country. Beware to those who dare enter after dusk!

The Union Cemetery is believed to be the most haunted in the country. Beware to those who dare enter after dusk!

Jessica Gordon Ryan

Follow Route 59 further north and you’ll come to an intersection, just beyond which is Union Cemetery, established in the 1700s and purported by numerous books and documentaries to be perhaps the country’s “most haunted” cemetery.

Legend has it The White Lady walks the cemetery at night. No one knows exactly who she is. Some believe she is a woman who was murdered in the 1800s, others that she is Harriet B. Seeley, a mother who lost a child before her own death in 1835, and roams the cemetery searching for her son.

Not far from the cemetery, just off Route 58, is the town’s one and only restaurant. The Old Aspetuck Bluebird Inn is known locally for its hearty and delicious New England breakfasts. The restaurant is cozy, charming and full of early Americana that gives it a 1940s feel. Come here with an appetite, and don’t worry about calories. Order some blueberry muffins to go – you may want them after you tag and cut down your own Christmas tree at one of the many tree farms in town.

Although Easton is a sleepy town, it has had its share of famous residents and weekenders. Helen Keller made Easton her home toward the end of her life (the town’s middle school is named after her). Other notables have included Jessica Tandy and Hume Cronin, Ann Baxter, Edna Ferber and Dan Rather. In 2009, a 76-foot Norway spruce from Easton traveled 61 miles to New York City, where it became the Rockefeller Center Christmas tree.

Comments
  • Jessica

    Dear Mike and Jill,

    I was wondering whose house that was! I’ve always loved it so! It seems we were (temporarily) neighbors. I was just around the corner, off of Beers on Reilly Rd. I miss Easton terribly.It really is a special place. My boys still both go to camp there at the ECC. I am just south of you in Fairfield and I also write for Fairfield Magazine – my editor there sees a need to include Easton and the community… hang tight! Meantime, I am sure the folks here at Yankee wouldn’t mind if you printed this out and shared it with all of your friends!

    Best, Jessica

    Reply
  • Brenda

    Hello Mike & Jill,
    That article was an online exclusive, but we’ll pass your lovely compliment on to the author.

    Reply
  • Is it possible or us to buy a copy of the magazine the featured this article about Easton? Great article about a town that we moved to 15 years ago and appreciate what Easton has and more importantly what it doesn’t have. And we also appreciate your taking a picture of our house!

    Thanks,

    Mike and Jill
    448 Morehouse Rd.

    Reply
  • Been living here for 15 months now and really love it everyday! But lets keep Easton a secret!

    Reply
  • Jessica

    Barbara and Chris,

    Most likely the older houses were built when the town was still Fairfield. If you go to Easton’s official website there is a very detailed history of the town.

    Reply
  • Barbara

    First settled in 1757? That can’t be accurate. My home was built in 1736, and it’s certainly not the oldest here!

    Reply

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