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Explore Massachusetts | Photographs

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From quiet country towns to bustling seaports, there’s always something new to explore in Massachusetts.

 Tower Hill –in the inviting town of Boylston, Massachusetts,— is the home of the Worcester County Horticultural Society, which traces its origins back to the 1840s. Learn more about Tower Hill!

Tower Hill –in the inviting town of Boylston, Massachusetts— is the home of the Worcester County Horticultural Society, which traces its origins back to the 1840s.
Learn more about Tower Hill!

Deb Despres

While New Bedford, Massachusetts, receives only a brief mention in Herman Mellville’s classic, Moby Dick, you know you’re in “The Whaling City” within moments after turning onto the JFK Memorial Highway. Learn more about New Bedford, Massachusetts!

While New Bedford, Massachusetts, receives only a brief mention in Herman Mellville’s classic, Moby Dick, you know you’re in “The Whaling City” within moments after turning onto the JFK Memorial Highway.
Learn more about New Bedford, Massachusetts!

Brenda Darroch

Boston’s Spectacle Island — a bucolic retreat for city dwellers — is the ultimate story of urban revitalization. Learn more about Spectacle Island!

Boston’s Spectacle Island — a bucolic retreat for city dwellers — is the ultimate story of urban revitalization.
Learn more about Spectacle Island!

Amy Traverso

As soon as you step foot onto the island of Nantucket, just 14 miles long and 3.5 miles wide off the coast of Cape Cod, you just know you’re somewhere special. Learn more about Nantucket!

As soon as you step foot onto the island of Nantucket, just 14 miles long and 3.5 miles wide off the coast of Cape Cod, you just know you’re somewhere special.
Learn more about Nantucket!

Aimee Seavey

Despite being home to nearly 60,000 residents, with a population density similar to that of Cambridge, Brookline, Massachusetts, still stubbornly calls itself a “town,” not a city.  Learn more about Brookline!

Despite being home to nearly 60,000 residents, with a population density similar to that of Cambridge, Brookline, Massachusetts, still stubbornly calls itself a “town,” not a city.
Learn more about Brookline!

Amy Traverso

Historic Salem, Massachusetts, is a city of layers—one historical era layered upon another. Learn more about Salem, Massachusetts!

Historic Salem, Massachusetts, is a city of layers—one historical era layered upon another.
Learn more about Salem, Massachusetts!

Alyson Horrocks

With enough people to make the streets hum, most shops and restaurants still open, and pleasant weather, a slightly off-season visit to Provincetown, Massachusetts at the tip of Cape Cod offers the best of both worlds. Learn more about Provincetown, Massachusetts!

With enough people to make the streets hum, most shops and restaurants still open, and pleasant weather, a slightly off-season visit to Provincetown, Massachusetts at the tip of Cape Cod offers the best of both worlds.
Learn more about Provincetown, Massachusetts!

Annie Graves

The village of Shelburne Falls is an anomaly in that it spans two towns – Shelburne and Buckland, both of which offer much to explore on a crisp fall day.  Learn more about Shelburne Falls!

The village of Shelburne Falls is an anomaly in that it spans two towns – Shelburne and Buckland, both of which offer much to explore on a crisp fall day.
Learn more about Shelburne Falls!

Brenda Darroch

The former mill city of Lowell, Massachusetts, has been working hard to establish itself as a top-notch spot in the state for education, history, and culture. Learn more about Lowell!

The former mill city of Lowell, Massachusetts, has been working hard to establish itself as a top-notch spot in the state for education, history, and culture.
Learn more about Lowell!

Aimee Seavey

You may not think of Martha’s Vineyard as a winter getaway, but you should.  Learn more about Martha's Vineyard!

You may not think of Martha’s Vineyard as a winter getaway, but you should.
Learn more about Martha’s Vineyard!

Ian Aldrich

Explore More of Massachusetts!

Comments
  • Judith

    GREW UP IN norwood ma. and have lived in AMHERST,Nh and DUBLIN,NH SUMMERS IN SEBAGO lake in MAINE.But have lived in PA. For 30 yrs now. MISS N.E. Very much.

    Reply
  • My family settled in the Bridgewater area almost 400 years ago. I grew up in upstate New York and New Jersey, but as many here have said, there is no place on earth like New England, and especially Massachusetts. I’ve lived in Georgia for many years, but I miss the snow and cold (am I crazy…?), the smells of spring, summer and fall, and the general FEEL of Massachusetts. Maybe, just maybe, I might retire up there…

    Reply
  • Just got back from a week on mid-Cape and East of. Had a blast ! TONS of history ! Visited Gloucester last summer , and will go back for more! Mass. has so much to offer in all towns and cities ! Thanks for the photos ! Love to see what is out there !

    Reply
  • Annie

    Outer Cape, Eastham, Wellfleet, Truro, Provincetown- indeed God’s country. Just breathe.

    Reply
  • jacki

    love all of these pictures. thank you so much. I’m from Northampton/house boarded Smith College. always wanted to visit the cape and Salem Mass

    Reply
  • ROBERT

    Even though I have lived in Colorado for 30 plus years and also in states like Nebraska and South Dakota, New England is still in my blood. I keep returning every year or so to walk the fields and beaches. Born in Norwood, grew up in Needham and summers in New Hampshire just keep pulling my mind back to my home. Yankee Magazine keeps me grounded in what a good life should be.

    Reply
  • dutch

    Would like previous email w/recipe for Amish mac salad and brussel sprout and squash salad.

    Reply
  • As expansive as Massachusetts in 20 or so images can’t begin to tell the story of MA. We have 16 National Historic sites and that is more than the rest of New England in total. Each and every village, town and city, large and small has a story to tell.
    I believe that this piece is more about giving you a taste of what you can find if you leave the computer and TV behind and get out and explore.

    Reply
  • Cheryl

    Great photos/sites to visit!

    One of my favorite places – Plymouth…. not especially for the “pilgrims” landing/rock…but the lore of Plymouth… I found especially, The Forefather’s Monument! Oh, my! What an amazing monument! From the craftsmanship to the story it tells – far surpasses even the Lady Liberty in my opinion. An historical , valuable piece of history – that I a native of NH, had never heard of! Historians & teachers alike should be ashamed that that was never taught nor shown to us…. I got some great photos – and a wonderful history lesson at the same time!

    Reply
  • Shelley

    I agree with Dale. And the one photo of Western Mass. (Shelburne Falls) looks like “Factory City”. I wouldn’t be inspired to visit there (by the photo). One could have at least used the “Bridge of Flowers”.

    The Town of Stockbridge, Jacob’s Pillow, The Mount, are all beautiful. I love the ocean; but there is great beauty in Western Mass. too.

    Thanks.

    Reply
  • The reason I love Yankee Magazine is articles like this that uncover undiscovered (by me) places in New England. I was born in MA and lived my youth in NH and VT. I have subsequently lived in VA, WV, IL, CA, TX, Saudi Arabia, Thailand, Australia, Russia, Kazakhstan, and South Africa. Many of these places have their own character and beauty but there is still no place like New England. I’m glad my roots are still there and it is still my family’s favorite vacation destination.

    Reply
  • Linda

    I have been a subscriber to “Yankee” magazine for many years and do not recall an article on the town of Fairhaven which shares the harbor and Acushnet River with the city of New Bedford. Fairhaven has a lot of history going back to the Revolutionary War but what is especially unique is the gorgeous architecture of buildings given to the town by its benefactor, Henry Huttleston Rogers, a partner in the original Standard Oil. Buildings include the high school (my own alma mater), the library, the Unitarian Church, town hall and what was an inn. Fairhaven was the home of the Delanos, FDR’s grandparents. Mark Twain was a close friend of Henry Rogers and visited Fairhaven often. I believe Rogers looked after Twain’s business and financial interests. There is a story that Rogers had the Tabitha Inn built to house Twain when he visited because Twain would help himself to artifacts in Roger’s home. I don’t know if there is any truth to the story but Twain’s autobiography mentions things in his CT home that came from Fairhaven. There is also a very beautiful cemetery in Fairhaven where all the Delanos, except Sarah, FDR’s mother, are buried.

    Reply
  • I love all of Massachusetts, but this is typical of the mindset of most people about the Commonwealth. Nine of the ten sites you show are inside I-495 or along the coast. It’s like Mitt Romney saying he’d been to Western Massachusetts after he visited Worcester. There’s a whole beautiful and fascinating world west of Worcester, with lots of history. People from NY & CT go roaring up I-91 for Vermont and New Hampshire, completely ignoring it, as well, and sometimes that’s OK. As a former resident of Conway (Massachusetts, NOT New Hampshire), I love Shelburne Falls and used to visit regularly, but look at all the other great destinations, from Old Sturbridge Village to the Hancock Shaker Museum. Tanglewood is not just outside of Boston, it’s almost a whole state away!

    Thanks!

    Reply

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