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Snow Pudding with Light Custard Sauce

3.76 avg. rating (75% score) - 17 votes

Snow Pudding with Light Custard Sauce

This light and refreshing snow pudding recipe is perfect for any occasion.

Yield: 12 servings

For the Base

Ingredients

  • 2 packages unflavored gelatin
  • 1/2 cup cold water
  • 1/2 cup lemon juice (approximately 2 lemons)
  • 2 cups sugar
  • 2 cups boiling water
  • 5 egg whites

Instructions

Dissolve unflavored gelatin in cold water. Add lemon juice, sugar, boiling water. Let gel until syrupy and just starting to set.

Beat egg whites until they form soft peaks, then beat in the gelatin until the mixture is really fluffy and white. Rinse a 1-1/2- to 2-quart mold with cold water and turn the pudding into it. Chill until firm, preferably overnight, then unmold onto a serving platter and serve with Light Custard Sauce.

Light Custard Sauce:

Ingredients

  • 1 quart milk
  • 5 egg yolks
  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • pinch of salt
  • 2-1/2 tablespoons cornstarch
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla

Instructions

In a double boiler or over low heat, heat milk. Beat egg yolks until fluffy, then slowly add to milk, then sugar and a pinch of salt. Heat mixture, stirring, then remove about 1/4 cup and dissolve cornstarch in it. Stir cornstarch mixture into custard; continue to cook and stir until slightly thickened (10 to 15 minutes). Let cool, then add vanilla.

For the Base

Comments
  • truefeather77

    I want that one, too! My mother went on and on about her grandmother’s recipe for it, and made one similar — but said it wasn’t as good.

    The pudding was white, light, and full of frothy bubbles (though it was gelatin-like), which fizzed in the mouth with each bite. And it was the custard sauce that was flavored with lemon (or more lemon). She only made it once, because she said it wasn’t enough like her grandmother’s.

    Reply
  • I would like to have to have a recipe for Snow Pudding that my grandmother made when I was very small. Because of that fact I never had any of it. My oldest sister told me how good it was but we can’t find the right recipe. All my sister can tell me about it is—it’s clear and has little white specks thru-out. I assume that’s where the name came from. I would very much appreciate any and all help from readers. Eunice Crites

    Reply
  • Anonymous

    I added the lemon zest from the lemons to it. My grandma made this for Sunday dessert often. My granfather called it wind pudding with air sauce. We all love it!

    Reply
  • Anonymous

    Unfortunately, you don’t mention how many egg whites are required. My Norwigian grandmother mades this recipe at Christmas. We used 4 egg whites, but also added 2 teaspoons lemon rasp. The combination of sour gelatin and sweet egg whites is what makes this recipe special and ideal after a heavy holiday meal.

    Reply

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