Photographs | Acadian Festival in Madawaska

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Photographer Jonathan Kozowyk made the trip by prop plane to the far northern reaches of the town of Madawaska, Maine, last summer to capture the spirit of a festival and its community.  Here are a few of the highlights of what he photographed during the beginning of the Acadian Festival, an annual gathering of Acadian people from near and far that celebrates the importance of their shared heritage.  Beyond the festival, Jonathan found the vast landscapes and the beauty of the architecture that defines this region.

Reenactors gather at the Acadian Cross Landing Site in Madawaska.

Reenactors gather at the Acadian Cross Landing Site in Madawaska.

Guy Dubay, stands proudly in front of the Tante Blanche Museum, a small history museum in a one-room log cabin in Madawaska.

Guy Dubay, stands proudly in front of the Tante Blanche Museum, a small history museum in a one-room log cabin in Madawaska.

Festival goers flock to the dance floor.

Festival goers flock to the dance floor.

Downtown Madawaska shows its Acadian pride.

Downtown Madawaska shows its Acadian pride.

Participants in the potato picking contest at last year's festival.

Participants in the potato picking contest at last year's festival.

Dirt floor interior of The Roy House at the Acadian Village.

Dirt floor interior of The Roy House at the Acadian Village.

A detail of the stacked and pegged style construction of The Roy House.

A detail of the stacked and pegged style construction of The Roy House.

Exterior of The Roy House, a typical example of 19th-century Maine Acadian log house construction.

Exterior of The Roy House, a typical example of 19th-century Maine Acadian log house construction.

White potato blossoms blanket a field at a farm near Madawaska.

White potato blossoms blanket a field at a farm near Madawaska.

The one-and-a-half story Levasseur-Ouellette House at the Acadian Village in Van Buren. The home is typical of those built by successful Maine Acadians in the mid-19th century.  The walls  were built with square-hewn logs and covered with clapboard siding.

The one-and-a-half story Levasseur-Ouellette House at the Acadian Village in Van Buren. The home is typical of those built by successful Maine Acadians in the mid-19th century. The walls were built with square-hewn logs and covered with clapboard siding.

Golden summer light washes over a field with the Musee Culturel du Mont-Carmel in the distance.

Golden summer light washes over a field with the Musee Culturel du Mont-Carmel in the distance.

Musee Culturel du Mont-Carmel's, a former Roman Catholic Church, is now home to  traditional Acadian artifacts.  Listed on the national register of historic places, the renovated structure is located in the small village of Lille.

Musee Culturel du Mont-Carmel's, a former Roman Catholic Church, is now home to traditional Acadian artifacts. Listed on the national register of historic places, the renovated structure is located in the small village of Lille.

Brian Theriault, gets into character for the reenactment of the 1785 landing of the first  Acadian settlers in Madawaska along the St. John River.

Brian Theriault, gets into character for the reenactment of the 1785 landing of the first Acadian settlers in Madawaska along the St. John River.

All photos/art by Jonathan Kozowyk

To get the itinerary for this year’s festival, please visit their Web site: acadianfestival.com

To learn more about Acadian festivals, read: Acadian Heritage | ‘Nous Sommes Encore Ici.’

 

Comments
  • This article about Acadians was one of the most interesting and heartwarming stories I’ve ever read in Yankee Magazine. Thank you so much.

    Reply
  • I am a descendent of the Hudon dit Beaulieu family. I am originally from Caribou but now reside in Vermont. I was very disappointed that I was unable to attend the Festival in 2013. I would be most interested in obtaining an informational book listing my forbearers. Can someone help me with this?

    Reply

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