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Homemade Applesauce

3.86 avg. rating (77% score) - 14 votes

Homemade Applesauce

This homemade applesauce recipe is easy to prepare, and the raisins add an extra depth of flavor.

Yield: About 1-1/2 quarts

Ingredients

  • 8 large Macintosh apples, peeled, cored, and quartered
  • 2-1/2 cups water
  • 1/4 cup sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1/3 cup seedless raisins (optional)

Instructions

Place the apples in a large Dutch oven. Add water, sugar, and cinnamon. Set on medium -- low heat and simmer until tender, stirring occasionally. Remove from heat and puree with a rotary beater on slowest speed to the desired consistency.

Stir in the raisins. When the sauce has cooled, pour it into a glass or plastic container and store in the refrigerator. Serve either warm or cold.

Comments
  • I, too, leave the peels on while cooking and run the apples through a food mill once cooked. My favorite apple variety for making applesauce is Ida Red: sauce made from this variety takes on the prettiest pink color you could ever imagine. Sugar is optional but cinnamon is a must. I purchased my food mill for less than five dollars at a garage sale, but Williams and Sonoma makes a nice one, but it’s pricey. It will pay for itself, however, when you factor in the cost of jarred applesauce you won’t have to buy.

    Reply
  • Barbara

    I wash, quarter and put the apples in a large pan with water, sugar, cinnamon, and nutmeg…simmer until soft. I use a foley food mill to separate skin, and seeds from the apple sauce…..Here again, lovely pink color little to no effort. All the good stuff cooked with the apples….more vitamins and nutrition this way. Once you make your own apple sauce….anything else is substandard.

    Reply
  • Growing up with a dairy farmer father and a school teacher mother meant that Dad did a lot of the prep and cooking of the food we raised and gathered.
    We never peeled the apples for applesauce. We gathered them, washed them and quartered and cored them, put them in a covered kettle with a little water and simmered until soft. Then this was put through the cone shaped food mill set up-how I loved that thing moving the wooden pestle around and seeing the pink sauce emerge from the tiny holes.
    Made this way the sauce has a lovely color and often does not need sugar at all. The hens loved the pomace too.

    Reply

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