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The Best Chowder in New England

4.00 avg. rating (80% score) - 15 votes

Love chowder? We scoured the region to find the best chowder in New England — one from each state —  from classic clam to creamy corn.

Classic New England Clam Chowder

Classic New England Clam Chowder

Kristin Teig

Just as Southerners bicker about barbecue, New Englanders are choosy about their chowder. Setting aside the issue of regional variations (creamy in Massa­chusetts, clear broth in Rhode Island), the very philosophy of what makes chowder chowder is subject to debate.

This stew-like dish has been around for centuries, so its precise historical roots are hard to peg. While the name is thought to derive from the French chaudière, referring not only to the “cauldron” but the ingredients within, the earliest published recipe comes from the September 23, 1751, edition of the Boston Evening Post. A layered “chouder” of onion, potatoes, salt pork, and fish (milk came later) was seasoned with salt, pepper, and herbs such as thyme, and served with hard crackers or “Biscuit.” Later, flour or cracker crumbs were added as a thickener. Over time, that evolutionary tree split further, yielding lobster chowder, Manhattan clam chowder, corn chowder, chicken chowder—enough variations to make an old salt sputter in indignation.

Chowder was never meant to be fancy. But it does evoke community: a shared bowl on a blustery day, a warm and savory meal, a taste of the seaside. We’ve scouted some of the best chowders in New England, honoring tradition while favoring local flavors (and giving vegetarians reason to celebrate as well).

Corn & Sweet Potato Chowder from Metro Bis

Corn & Sweet Potato Chowder from Metro Bis.

Kristin Teig

Corn & Sweet Potato Chowder | Connecticut

METRO BIS

Historically, corn has been a major crop for the farms that lie along the fertile floodplain of the Connecticut River Valley. So while this version of chowder breaks from the usual potatoes and salt pork, its New England and Native American roots are solid. Chef Christopher Prosperi of Metro Bis, an innovative bistro tucked inside an elegant country inn in Simsbury, strips the sweet kernels and simmers the cobs in water to make a wholesome corn broth. In August, when the corn is at its peak, he says the broth is so sweet “you want to bathe in it.” He even freezes bushels of corn so that he can serve the stew year-round. Some added sweet potatoes, a little garlic, and cream turn this chowder from sultry to sassy.

The Simsbury 1820 House, 731 Hopmeadow Street, Simsbury, CT. 860-651-1908; metrobis.com

Corn & Sweet Potato Chowder

While this version of corn & sweet potato chowder breaks from the usual potatoes and salt pork, its New England and Native American roots are solid. Chef Christopher Prosperi of Metro Bis, an innovative bistro tucked inside The Simsbury 1820 House, in Connecticut, strips the sweet kernels and simmers the cobs in water to make a wholesome corn broth. In August, when the corn is at its peak, he says the broth is so sweet “you want to bathe in it.” He even freezes bushels of corn so that he can serve the stew year-round. Some added sweet potatoes, a little garlic, and cream turn this chowder from sultry to sassy.

Total Time: 1 hour 15 minutes
Hands-On Time: 1 hour
Yield: 8 servings

Christopher Prosperi's Corn & Sweet Potato Chowder

Ingredients

  • 8 ears corn, shucked and silks removed
  • 6 cups plus 1 tablespoon water
  • 1 tablespoon unsalted butter
  • 1 tablespoon canola oil
  • 1 medium-size onion, cut into ¼-inch cubes
  • 1 rib celery, cut into ¼-inch cubes
  • 2 teaspoons kosher salt, plus more to taste
  • ½ teaspoon chopped fresh thyme
  • 2 large cloves garlic, chopped
  • ½ cup dry white wine
  • ½ cup heavy cream
  • 2 cups diced peeled sweet potatoes (cut into ¼-inch cubes)
  • 1 tablespoon white vinegar
  • Freshly ground black pepper, to taste
  • 2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley

Instructions

Use a knife to cut the corn kernels from the cobs and set aside. Place the cobs in a 5- to 7-quart pot and cover with 6 cups of cold water.

Bring to a simmer and cook 30 minutes. Strain the cobs and discard them, reserving the water, which is now your corn broth. It should equal about 4 cups. Set it aside.

Return the pot to the stove over medium-low heat. Add the butter and let it melt; then add the oil. Add the onion, celery, salt, and remaining 1 tablespoon of water. Cook, stirring, until the vegetables are soft and translucent, 6 to 8 minutes.

Stir in the thyme and chopped garlic; cook for an additional minute.

Increase the heat to medium-high and add the wine. Bring to a simmer, and cook, stirring continuously, until it reduces down to almost dry.

Add the reserved corn broth, cream, and sweet potatoes. Bring to a simmer and cook 20 to 30 minutes, or until the potatoes are tender.

Add the corn kernels and simmer until just cooked, about 5 minutes. Add the white vinegar, a couple of grinds of black pepper, and parsley.

Season to taste with kosher salt. Serve hot.

Fish Chowder from Helen's Restaurant.

Fish Chowder from Helen’s Restaurant.

Kristin Teig

Fish Chowder | Maine

HELEN’S RESTAURANT

When Helen and Larry Mugnai opened Helen’s Restaurant in Machias, Maine, in 1950, their fish chowder—made with North Atlantic haddock—was served only on Fridays. So you can thank current owners Julie and David Barker, who made some slight alterations (let’s call them improvements) to the “wildly popular” chowder, for making it a daily item. Its simplicity and resourcefulness are all Down East ingenuity: The haddock is cooked in the potato water, and that broth becomes the basis of the chowder. When a devastating fire last summer forced the Barkers to rebuild their restaurant, they upgraded the design by relocating a fireplace and adding small conference rooms and a bar, but they knew where to draw the line: They wouldn’t dream of changing the menu, which means that the haddock chowder is here to stay. Diners will once again enjoy a hearty bowl overlooking the Machias River when the restaurant reopens, which the Barkers say is sometime early this spring.

111 Main Street, Machias, ME. 207-255-8423; helensrestaurantmachias.com

Fish Chowder | Maine

When Helen and Larry Mugnai opened Helen’s Restaurant in Machias, Maine, in 1950, their fish chowder—made with North Atlantic haddock—was served only on Fridays. So you can thank current owners Julie and David Barker, who made some slight alterations (let’s call them improvements) to the “wildly popular” chowder, for making it a daily item. The simplicity of this fish chowder is all Down East ingenuity: The haddock is cooked in the potato water, and that broth becomes the basis of the chowder. When a devastating fire last summer forced the Barkers to rebuild their restaurant, they upgraded the design by relocating a fireplace and adding small conference rooms and a bar, but they knew where to draw the line: They wouldn’t dream of changing the menu, which means that the haddock chowder is here to stay. Diners will once again enjoy a hearty bowl overlooking the Machias River when the restaurant reopens, which the Barkers say is sometime early this spring.

Total Time: 45 minutes
Hands-On Time: 30 minutes
Yield: 8-10 servings

Helen's Original Fish Chowder

Ingredients

  • 4 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 1 medium-size onion, cut into 1/4-inch cubes
  • 4 cups water
  • 2 medium-size russet potatoes, peeled and cut into 1/4-inch cubes
  • 2 1/2 - 3 pounds skinned fresh haddock, cut into 1 1/2-inch chunks
  • 2 cups heavy cream
  • 2 teaspoons kosher salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon white pepper
  • 1/4 teaspoon dried dill

Instructions

In a 5- to 7-quart pot over medium-low heat, melt the butter. Add the onion and cook, stirring often, until translucent, 6 to 8 minutes. Set aside.

Pour the water into a 3- to 4-quart pot and add the potatoes. Bring the water to a boil, then reduce to a simmer and cook until just tender, about 10 minutes. Remove the potatoes with a slotted spoon and set aside.

Add the fish to the potato liquid and simmer until the fish begins to flake, about 10 minutes. Remove the fish with a slotted spoon and add it and the potatoes to the cooked onions in the larger pot. Stir.

Slowly add the potato/fish broth and the heavy cream to the onion/fish/potato mixture. Stir well. Add the salt and white pepper; then add the dill. Simmer gently over low heat for at least 15 minutes, stirring occasionally. Serve hot.

Classic New England Clam Chowder

New England Clam Chowder from Chatham Pier Fish Restaurant.

Kristin Teig

Classic New England Clam Chowder | Massachusetts

CHATHAM PIER MARKET

If salt pork, potatoes, and onions define traditional New England clam chowder, then this one is a classic, save for the use of bacon instead of salt pork. There’s always a pot simmering at this shingled shack on Chat-ham Pier, ready to ladle into pints and quarts. While purists might protest the roux (a mixture of butter and flour) used as a thickener, this not-too-thick, not-too-thin creamy-briny chowder—full of fresh chopped clams, potatoes, bacon, and a hint of thyme—will win them over. Chowder master Doug Ricciardi’s secret? Keep it “old school” by using white pepper. Nothing fancy but mighty fine, especially eaten at the nearby picnic tables on a sunny day with a view of the water and seals swimming by.

45 Barcliff Avenue Extension, Chatham, MA. 508-945-3474; chathampierfishmarket.com

Classic New England Clam Chowder | Massachusetts

If salt pork, potatoes, and onions define traditional New England clam chowder, then this one is a classic, save for the use of bacon instead of salt pork. There’s always a pot simmering at this shingled shack on Chatham Pier, ready to ladle into pints and quarts. While purists might protest the roux (a mixture of butter and flour) used as a thickener, this not-too-thick, not-too-thin creamy-briny chowder—full of fresh chopped clams, potatoes, bacon, and a hint of thyme—will win them over. Chowder master Doug Ricciardi’s secret? Keep it “old school” by using white pepper. Nothing fancy but mighty fine, especially eaten at the nearby picnic tables on a sunny day with a view of the water and seals swimming by.

How to Make Classic Clam Chowder

 

Total Time: 1 hour 15 minutes
Hands-On Time: 45 minutes
Yield: 8 to 10 servings

Chatham Pier Fish Market classic New England Clam Chowder

Ingredients

  • 3 strips thick-cut bacon
  • 4 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 1 large onion, cut into 1/4-inch cubes
  • 1 rib celery, cut into 1/4-inch cubes
  • 1 teaspoon chopped fresh thyme leaves
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 2 medium-size white potatoes, peeled and cut into ¼-inch cubes
  • 1/2 cup all-purpose flour
  • 4 cups bottled clam juice, divided
  • 1 pound chopped fresh clam meat, with juices (see Note)
  • Kosher salt to taste
  • 3 cups light cream
  • 1 teaspoon white pepper

Instructions

Set a 4- to 6-quart pot over medium-low heat. Add the bacon and cook, turning occasionally, until crisp, 10 to 12 minutes. Remove the bacon, leaving the fat in the pot, and crumble into small pieces; set aside.

Add the butter, onion, celery, thyme, and bay leaves to the pot. Cook, stirring often, until onions are tender and translucent, 6 to 8 minutes.

Return the bacon to the pot and stir. Reduce the heat to low and cook, stirring occasionally, while you prepare the potatoes.

In a 2- to 3-quart pot on high heat, boil the diced potatoes in salted water until tender, 5 to 8 minutes. Drain and set aside.

Turning back to the onion/bacon mixture, increase the heat to medium-low.

Add the flour gradually, stirring continuously, until a thick paste forms. Stir and cook 5 minutes.

Increase the heat to medium and slowly add the bottled clam juice, 1 cup at a time, incorporating it into the mixture before adding more.

Increase the heat to medium-high and add the potatoes and clam meat with its juices. Keep stirring 5 minutes, until the clams are tender.

Add the cream slowly; then stir in the white pepper.

Discard the bay leaves before serving. Serve hot.

Additional Notes:

Many supermarkets carry frozen, chopped clam meat in 1-pound containers, which is fresher than canned and just as convenient. Simply defrost before using.

Chatham Pier Fish Market classic New England Clam Chowder

Seafood Chowder with Lobster from Newick's Lobster House.

Seafood Chowder with Lobster from Newick’s Lobster House.

Kristin Teig

Seafood Chowder with Lobster | New Hampshire

NEWICK’S LOBSTER HOUSE

Already a successful lobsterman at 18, Jack Newick began buying up land around Dover Point, piece by piece, in the 1940s. More than six decades later, his one-time lobster shack is now a seafood beacon, accommodating up to 600 people at a time and promising a romantic sunset from just about any seat in the house. People make the trek from far south and west to crack open a steamed lobster or gobble up the excellent fried seafood. But the rich seafood chowder—one of six “chowdahs” on the menu—is such a hit that it has to be made off-site. You can get your chowder the “original” way, teeming with bay scallops, shrimp, clams, and haddock—but insiders know to ask for added lobster, which turns this chowder into something like a seafood tour de force.

431 Dover Point Road, Dover, NH. 603-742-3205; newicks.com

Seafood Chowder with Lobster | New Hampshire

Already a successful lobsterman at 18, Jack Newick began buying up land around Dover Point, piece by piece, in the 1940s. More than six decades later, his one-time lobster shack is now a seafood beacon, accommodating up to 600 people at a time and promising a romantic sunset from just about any seat in the house. People make the trek from far south and west to crack open a steamed lobster or gobble up the excellent fried seafood. But the rich seafood chowder—one of six “chowdahs” on the menu—is such a hit that it has to be made off-site. You can get your chowder the “original” way, teeming with bay scallops, shrimp, clams, and haddock—but insiders know to ask for added lobster, which turns this chowder into something like a seafood tour de force.

Consider cooking and chilling the lobsters a day before preparing the chowder, to make it easier to remove the meat. But be sure to reserve the cooking water, which you’ll use to simmer the potatoes.

Total Time: 1 hour 20 minutes
Hands-On Time: 1 hour
Yield: 10 to 15 servings

Newick's Lobster House | Seafood Chowder with Lobster

Ingredients

  • 3 small (1 pound each or less) lobsters (also called “chicken” lobsters)
  • 4 cups plus ½ cup lobster cooking water
  • 3 cups diced red potatoes, skins on (cut into ¼-inch cubes)
  • 4 strips thick-cut bacon, diced
  • 4 tablespoons salted butter
  • 1 medium-size onion, cut into ¼-inch cubes
  • 2 ribs celery, cut into ¼-inch cubes
  • ¼ cup all-purpose flour
  • ½ cup bottled clam juice
  • 2 cups light cream
  • 1 pound bay scallops
  • 1 pound chopped fresh clam meat, with juices
  • 1½ pounds haddock filet, skinned and cut into 1-inch pieces
  • 1 pound small (51–60 or 61–70 count) shrimp
  • 1 cup milk
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt
  • Freshly ground white or black pepper, to taste
  • Garnish: chopped fresh parsley or paprika

Instructions

Fill a lobster pot halfway with water and bring to a boil over high heat. Add the lobsters, cover, and reduce the heat to medium; cook 8 minutes. Remove the lobsters and set them aside to cool.

Reserve 4½ cups of the lobster water. When lobsters are cool and easy to handle, remove the meat from the claws, claw joints, and tails. Chop the meat coarsely and set aside.

Put 4 cups of the reserved lobster water in a 2- to 3-quart pot, add the potatoes, and simmer until tender, 5 to 7 minutes. Drain and set aside.

In a skillet over medium heat, fry the bacon, turning occasionally, until cooked but not crisp, 8 to 10 minutes. Set aside.

Melt the butter in a 4- to 6-quart pot over medium-low heat.

Add the onion and celery, and cook, stirring, until tender, 6 to 8 minutes. Add the bacon and cook another 3 minutes.

Add the flour gradually, whisking continuously, to make a roux.

Reduce the heat to low and continue stirring 5 minutes. Increase the heat to medium and slowly whisk in the remaining ½ cup of lobster water, then the bottled clam juice and the cream.

Add the scallops, clam meat with its juices, haddock, and shrimp.

Stir in the cooked potatoes, milk, salt, and pepper.

Reduce the heat to low and simmer, stirring occasionally, until all the fish has cooked through and flavors have combined, about 15 minutes.

Right before serving, add the lobster meat.

Garnish with parsley or paprika.
Clear Broth Clam Chowder from Matunuck Oyster Bar.

Clear Broth Clam Chowder from Matunuck Oyster Bar.

Kristin Teig

Clear Broth Clam Chowder | Rhode Island

MATUNUCK OYSTER BAR

No wonder Rhode Islanders prefer clear broth over cream—at every turn, they’re surrounded by saltwater. To savor the Ocean State’s take on chowder, visit Matunuck Oyster Bar, overlooking the eddies of Potter Pond in South Kingstown. This rich broth is loaded with potatoes, bacon, and either cherry-stones or quahogs (same species of hard-shell clam, quahogs being bigger than cherrystones), depending on what’s fresh that day. Owner Perry Raso is so fastidious about his shellfish that he operates his own seven-acre oyster farm right by the restaurant.

629 Succotash Road, South Kingstown, RI. 401-783-4202; rhodyoysters.com

Clear Broth Clam Chowder | Rhode Island

No wonder Rhode Islanders prefer clear broth over cream—at every turn, they’re surrounded by saltwater. To savor the Ocean State’s take on clear broth clam chowder, visit Matunuck Oyster Bar, overlooking the eddies of Potter Pond in South Kingstown. The rich broth of this clear broth chowder is loaded with potatoes, bacon, and either cherry-stones or quahogs (same species of hard-shell clam, quahogs being bigger than cherrystones), depending on what’s fresh that day. Owner Perry Raso is so fastidious about his shellfish that he operates his own seven-acre oyster farm right by the restaurant.

Total Time: 1 hour 15 minutes
Hands-On Time: 45 minutes
Yield: 8 to 10 servings

Matunuck Clear Broth Clam Chowder

Ingredients

  • 8 pounds small quahogs or large cherrystone clams
  • 7 cups water
  • 6 cups clam broth (from steaming) or 4 cups clam broth plus 2 cups bottled clam juice
  • 3 slices thick-sliced bacon, cut into ¼-inch cubes
  • 4 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 2 medium-size onions, cut into ¼-inch cubes
  • 3 ribs celery, cut into ¼-inch cubes
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 2 pounds Yukon Gold or other all-purpose potatoes, peeled and cut into ½-inch pieces
  • 2 tablespoons chopped fresh Italian parsley
  • 2 tablespoons minced fresh chives
  • 1 teaspoon minced fresh dill
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste

Instructions

Scrub the clams and rinse them clean.

Add 7 cups of water to a large stockpot fitted with a steamer basket or colander, and bring to a boil.

Add half the clams to the basket and cover. Steam until the clams open, 5 to 10 minutes. (Discard any clams that don’t open.)

Repeat with the second batch of clams. Reserve 6 cups of the broth. Set aside.

Cool the clams; remove the meat from the shells and dice it into ½-inch pieces. Keep them covered and refrigerated until ready to use.

Put the bacon in a 5- to 7-quart pot over medium heat. Cook, stirring occasionally, until golden brown, about 10 minutes.

Pour off all but 1 tablespoon of the bacon fat, leaving the bacon in the pot. Reduce the heat to medium-low.

Add the butter, onions, celery, and bay leaves, and cook, stirring occasionally, until the onions are softened but not browned, 6 to 8 minutes.

Add the potatoes and reserved clam broth to the pot. Continue cooking over medium heat until the chowder begins to simmer. If it begins to boil, reduce the heat slightly. Cook until the potatoes are tender, about 15 minutes.

Just before serving, remove the pot from the heat, stir in the clams and herbs, discard the bay leaves, and season to taste with salt and pepper.

Serve hot.

Additional Notes:

Steaming the clams might seem laborious, but it’s actually easy and makes a briny broth. Aim to extract 6 cups of broth from the clams; if not, you’ll need to have some bottled clam juice on hand to round it out.
Manhattan Clam Chowder with Spicy Sausage from The Reservoir Restaurant & Tap Room.

Manhattan Clam Chowder with Spicy Sausage from The Reservoir Restaurant & Tap Room.

Kristin Teig

Manhattan Clam Chowder with Spicy Sausage | Vermont

THE RESERVOIR RESTAURANT & TAP ROOM

How can a restaurant in the only landlocked New England state claim Manhattan clam chowder as its own when the tomatoes are from Rhode Island and the clams come from the coast? Leave it to migration (and the fact that many Manhattanites have found refuge in the Green Mountain State). When Vermont native Shawn Beede attended Johnson & Wales University in Rhode Island, he interned in Bar Harbor, Maine, where his boss served a tomato-based chowder. Now he puts his own stamp on the form by adding spicy sausage and bacon, sourced locally from Vermont Smoke & Cure. It’s the perfect antidote to a chilly spring day and a reminder that whatever the form, New Englanders are sticklers when it comes to quality chowder.

1 South Main Street, Waterbury, VT . 802-244-7827; waterburyreservoir.com

Manhattan Clam Chowder with Spicy Sausage | Vermont

How can a restaurant in the only landlocked New England state claim Manhattan clam chowder as its own when the tomatoes are from Rhode Island and the clams come from the coast? Leave it to migration (and the fact that many Manhattanites have found refuge in the Green Mountain State). When Vermont native Shawn Beede attended Johnson & Wales University in Rhode Island, he interned in Bar Harbor, Maine, where his boss served a tomato-based chowder. Now he puts his own stamp on the form by adding spicy sausage and bacon, sourced locally from Vermont Smoke & Cure. This recipe for Manhattan clam chowder with spicy sausage the perfect antidote to a chilly spring day and a reminder that whatever the form, New Englanders are sticklers when it comes to quality chowder.

Total Time: 1 hour
Hands-On Time: 45 minutes
Yield: 8 servings

The Reservoir Restaurant & Tap Room | Manhattan Clam Chowder with Spicy Sausage

Ingredients

  • 4 strips thick-cut bacon, diced
  • 2 spicy Italian sausages, casings removed
  • 1 cup peeled and diced Yukon Gold or other white potatoes (cut into ¼-inch cubes), divided
  • 2 tablespoons chopped garlic
  • 1 sweet onion, such as Vidalia, cut into ¼-inch cubes
  • 2 ribs celery, cut into ¼-inch cubes
  • 2 carrots, cut into ¼-inch cubes
  • 1 green bell pepper, cut into ¼-inch cubes
  • 1 sprig fresh thyme
  • 2 sprigs fresh rosemary
  • 4 cups bottled clam juice
  • 1 28-ounce can plus 1 cup diced tomatoes, including liquid
  • 1 tablespoon Old Bay seasoning
  • Kosher salt to taste
  • 1 tablespoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 2 cups chopped or minced fresh clam meat, with juices

Instructions

In a 5- to 7-quart pot over medium heat, cook the bacon, sausages, and ½ cup of the potatoes until the sausages and bacon are browned. (Use a spoon to break up the sausages as you go.)

Add the garlic, onion, celery, carrots, bell pepper, and herbs. Cook, stirring, until the vegetables are tender and the onions translucent, about 10 minutes.

Increase the heat to medium-high and add the bottled clam juice, stirring to scrape any browned bits off the bottom of the pot. Add the tomatoes in their liquid and the remaining ½ cup of the potatoes. Bring the chowder to a simmer.

Add Old Bay and season with salt and pepper. Simmer (don’t boil) until the potatoes are tender, 15 to 20 minutes.

Add the clam meat with its juices to the chowder just before serving. Serve hot.
Comments
  • I love homemade corn chowder! Moody’s in Waldoboro ME is delicious! We are from MA but now reside in MI. When we ttavel to ME we try to hit Moody’s on Wednesday for corn chowder
    Yum!

    Reply
  • celeste

    I think the Rye Tavern in Plymouth could be added to the list. A creamy chowder with a small amount of mashed potatoes in it and 2 fried clams topping the bowl. Excellent

    Reply
  • Betsy

    thank you, Don Micklon!!!! Manhattan “clam chowder” is to may soup with some clams thrown in…..it’s not chowdah at all!!

    Reply
  • Great article. We’re pleased to announce that both Matunuck Oyster Bar and The Reservoir Restaurants will be competing in Chowdafest this fall. Chowdafest features 40 award winning restaurants covering all of New England. Matunuck Oyster Bar is among two RI restaurants defending Rhode Island style clam chowder and The Reservoir is among a group competing for best Manhattan that includes The Soup Spot from Manhattan, 5x LBI Chowderfest champion Stefano’s as well as defending champion Gray Goose from Fairfield CT. Our competition features ten restaurants each in four different categories: Classic New England clam chowder; Traditional Chowder just for Rhode Island and Manhattan chowders, Creative Chowder and Soup/Bisque. People pay to be a judge, sample all the entries and rate all the chowder and soup on a scale from 7 to 10.5. The entries with the highest average is declared “Best of New England”. Chowdafest is a “fun”raiser for the fight against hunger.

    Chowdafest has it’s own Chowda-Trail featuring all of the restaurants competing. We’re the largest chowder and soup competition in New England. To learn more, visit http://www.Chowdafest.org.

    Reply
  • I love RI chowder (clear broth) . It’s my favorite. But then again I’m a native Rhode Islander.

    Reply
  • Oh boy — those look absolutely WONDERFUL!!! I was born in Maine, but now live in Oklahoma — I miss the ocean more than I can say. AND I certainly miss the fresh seafood available in New England. Oh — how I wish I could have the recipes for these chowders! Sigh….. how I miss AUTHENTIC chowdah!!!

    Reply
  • About that Manhattan Clam chowder: I recall a line in a play that I directed while teaching in a small high school in the White Mountains of New Hampshire. The local sheriff is comparing qualities of varying “chowdahs”. He is asking the young couple about the Manhattan style. The sheriff’s lines go like this: “Put tamatahs in it, don’t they? ( nods of assent and an unconsequential “yes'” by one, followed by a pregnant pause, followed by the sheriff’s killing observation; ” Tain’t Chowdah!”

    Reply

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