Topic: Vermont

Vermont Dairy Farm | Photographs of Farm Life

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Melvin is shown holding a cherished photo of his Uncle Willis plowing the land.  There is a deep ancestral tie to the land through many generations in his family

Melvin is shown holding a cherished photo of his Uncle Willis plowing the land. There is a deep ancestral tie to the land through many generations in his family

The timeless-and often uncontrollable-pressures of weather and market weigh heavily on Melvin's shoulders.  He acknowledges that he doesn't know what the future will bring

The timeless-and often uncontrollable-pressures of weather and market weigh heavily on Melvin's shoulders. He acknowledges that he doesn't know what the future will bring

Grandson Zach takes a break in the hayfield

Grandson Zach takes a break in the hayfield

A freshly rolled bale of hay ready to be wrapped and stored for the winter

A freshly rolled bale of hay ready to be wrapped and stored for the winter

Stacks of freshly wrapped hay

Stacks of freshly wrapped hay

The workday often begins at 5:00 a.m. and doesn't end until late in the evening

The workday often begins at 5:00 a.m. and doesn't end until late in the evening

Melvin working his land to put up hay for the winter.  The work of a dairy farmer is constant

Melvin working his land to put up hay for the winter. The work of a dairy farmer is constant

Melvin with his grandson, Zach, on the farm

Melvin with his grandson, Zach, on the farm

Zach runs to keep up with his grandfather

Zach runs to keep up with his grandfather

Dairy farmer Melvin Churchill seen here haying a section of his 110 acres in Cabot, Vermont.  For many farmers facing economic uncertainty, the pressure to sell becomes insurmountable

Dairy farmer Melvin Churchill seen here haying a section of his 110 acres in Cabot, Vermont. For many farmers facing economic uncertainty, the pressure to sell becomes insurmountable

Dairy cows graze on Churchill's farm.  Melvin keeps a herd of 75 cows, mostly Holsteins; 42 of them currently provide milk for the organic market, a more stable hedge against frequent fluctuations in conventional milk prices

Dairy cows graze on Churchill's farm. Melvin keeps a herd of 75 cows, mostly Holsteins; 42 of them currently provide milk for the organic market, a more stable hedge against frequent fluctuations in conventional milk prices

Melvin Churchill with his partner Janet Whitlock and his son Matt, who is working the farm with his father

Melvin Churchill with his partner Janet Whitlock and his son Matt, who is working the farm with his father

Keeping the farm afloat is a constant struggle

Keeping the farm afloat is a constant struggle

Melvin's son Matt is working with his father to keep the family's farming tradition alive

Melvin's son Matt is working with his father to keep the family's farming tradition alive

All photos/art by Peter Miller

Photographer Peter Miller has spent a lifetime capturing Vermont and her people. In this slide show, he turns his lens on dairy farmer Melvin Churchill as he struggles to keep his family farm in Cabot, Vermont afloat in these turbulent financial times.

See more of Peter Miller’s work — including his books Vermont People and Vermont Farm Women — at www.petermillerphotography.com.
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