New England Traveler

Planning a New England day trip, weekend getaway, or longer adventure? Explore our curated New England travel directory, featuring picks from the editors of Yankee Magazine (the New England experts since 1935) for the best things to do in each state, plus where to shop, eat, and stay.

The Freedom Trail

The Freedom Trail lets you immerse yourself in early America on this 2.5-mile journey. Visit churches, meetinghouses, key markers: 16 nationally significant historic sites in all.–Yankee Magazine, May/June 2012On Boston’s 2.5-mile Freedom Trail, the birth of the American Revolution comes alive–but only if the tour guide brings it to life.Clearly, the preferred characters are the “interesting” underdogs we don’t know about. Besides James Otis Jr. and Sarah Revere, there’s Ebenezer Mackintosh, a shoemaker who led a mob in destroying the homes of Chief Justice Thomas Hutchinson and Stamp Act administrator Andrew Oliver–a wealthy Boston merchant and a symbol of the elite who ruled the colonies while happily kissing England’s micro-managing butt. My list is small. With the exception of Abigail Adams and Martha Washington, Revolutionary War women are far less widely known than their men.For more information on Freedom Trail tours, visit: thefreedomtrail.org–Yankee Magazine, May/June 2011The tried-and-true embraces the new with the Freedom Trail Foundation’s digital audio tour. Paul Revere’s horse clippety-clops over cobblestones; fife-and-drum music announces each official stop; and celebrity voices (Ted Kennedy, among others) lend color and commentary as you walk the 2.5-mile red stripe connecting the 16 historic sites. One big plus: You can stop and start the tour at leisure and repeat segments at will. (“Walk into History” tours, led by guides in 18th-century dress, are also offered several times daily.) Headphone versions (like standard museum audio tours) are available at the Boston Common Visitor Information Center—or you can download the entire two-hour tour onto your MP3 player. Revolutionary indeed!Yankee Magazine April 2007Follow the red stripe along a three-mile path that connects 16 of Boston’s most popular historic sites and traces the people, places, and events that helped define the “Cradle of Liberty.”Yankee Magazine April 2005Fresh signs, more guides and spiffed-up amenities make the 2.5-mile Freedom Trail better than ever. Only 3 of the 16 Revolutionary-era sites charge admission. Information, tours and maps available at Boston National Historical Park Visitor Center.Yankee Magazine April 2004Fresh signs, more guides and spiffed-up amenities make the 2.5-mile Freedom Trail better than ever. Only 3 of the 16 Revolutionary-era sites charge admission. Information, tours and maps available at Boston National Historical Park Visitor Center.Yankee Magazine April 2003

Boston Common Visitor Information Center
148 Tremont St
Boston
MA
02210
617-357-8300
The Freedom Trail
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