Potatoes In A Wire Cage

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Potatoes In A Wire Cage

http://www.wikihow.com/Grow-Potatoes-in-a-Wire-Cage

Ingredients

  • Take a piece of wire stock fence, or other sturdy wire fence about ten feet long, and roll it into a cylinder about 3 feet wide. Fasten the end to the fence with wire to hold it together. It should form a strong but easy to open cylinder that stands about four feet tall.
  • Prepare your soil, loosening it, and adding a bit of fertilizer.This will get them off to a good start.
  • Plant your potato seedlings as you normally would, three to four inches deep, hand tamping the soil around them.
  • Place the wire hoops so that they are standing upright around the planted seed potatoes,centering the future plants .
  • Your potato plants will soon be popping out of the soil; as they grow, fill in the space inside the fence with more dirt and compost.Do not bury the plants; only bring the soil level up inisde the cylinder two to three inches. Continue to fill in the cylinder as the plants grow; The plants will use this extra soil to grow even more potatoes in. Soon, the cylinder will be filled with dirt, compost, and potatoes.
  • When the plant tops dry and wither, the potatoes are ready to harvest. Simply un-do the wire fasteners and pull away the fence.Your potatoes will be ready to harvest, without digging, right in the cylinder of soil.

Instructions

Plant your potato plants as you normally would,except plant five or six of them close together, so that they will fit inside the upright cylinder of fence when it is stood up over them. Stand the fence up first, and use it to mark a circle in the soil where you should plant the potatoes. You can plant them right next to one another, as the plants will grow upright in the fence, and not spread out. You can actually plant the groups of cylinders right next to one another, saving a lot of garden space.

If you have trouble with Potato Beetles in your area, you can cover the entire cylinder with one of the various materials used for row covers, or even cheese cloth, to keep them at bay.
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