Tag: clams

New England Traveler

Lobster Bake with boat tour of Little Swan Island

Time: 3:30pm – 6:30pm Space Limited: First 50 peopleFee: $35Bring the family out for some time on the water viewing Little Swan Island and then stop at the campground for a traditional lobster bake! Clams, lobster, corn, potato, salad, and desert. Dress for the weather, as it can be cooler

New England Today

The Commons Lunch

Commons’ stuffies come in heaping portions–a bit spicy, with lots of clams, and both regular sausage and chourico, keeping the dish moist and meaty. 48 Commons, Little Compton. 401-635-4388

New England Traveler

Lobster Bake with boat tour of Little Swan Island

Time: 3:30pm – 6:30pm Space Limited: First 50 peopleFee: $35Bring the family out for some time on the water viewing Little Swan Island and then stop at the campground for a traditional lobster bake! Clams, lobster, corn, potato, salad, and desert. Dress for the weather, as it can be cooler

New England Today

Anthony’s Seafood

Anthony’s stuffies come in both mild and hot options: roasted peppers in the low-key version, cherry peppers in the spicier one. Both include a bit of chourico and a ton of chopped clams. 963 Aquidneck Ave., Middletown. 401-846-9620, 401-848-5058; anthonysseafood.net

New England Traveler

Lobster Bake with boat tour of Little Swan Island

Time: 3:30pm – 6:30pm Space Limited: First 50 peopleFee: $35Bring the family out for some time on the water viewing Little Swan Island and then stop at the campground for a traditional lobster bake! Clams, lobster, corn, potato, salad, and desert. Dress for the weather, as it can be cooler

New England Today

Amaral’s Fish and Chips

For your basic stuffie, head to Amaral’s. This shop prides itself on letting the seafood shine through: delectable clams seasoned with onion, celery, and spices, crispy on the top from baking in a hot oven. 4 Redmond St., Warren. 401-247-0675; amaralsfishandchips.com

New England Traveler

Amaral’s Fish and Chips

For your basic stuffie, head to Amaral’s. This shop prides itself on letting the seafood shine through: delectable clams seasoned with onion, celery, and spices, crispy on the top from baking in a hot oven.–Yankee Magazine, May/June 2011

New England Today

Kelly’s

For a place that branded itself on its meat, Kelly’s does surprisingly well with seafood. We found a sprightly, creamy broth, rich in potatoes; it’s a bit lighter on the clams, but fully aromatic and delicious. Locations in Allston, Danvers, Medford, Natick, Revere (where it all began), and Saugus. 781-233-5700;

New England Traveler

Anthony’s Seafood Restaurant

Anthony’s stuffies come in both mild and hot options: roasted peppers in the low-key version, cherry peppers in the spicier one. Both include a bit of chourico and a ton of chopped clams.–Yankee Magazine, May/June 2011

New England Today

Farmer Brown’s Farm Stand

Farmer Bob Brown and his wife, Kathy, have found their true calling in the chowder they serve at this year-round market. It’s a thick, stick-to-your-ribs style, supremely creamy, but fresh and brimming with clams. 210 Maple St., Middleton. 978-774-7110; farmerbrownsfarmstand.com

New England Traveler

Aunt Carrie’s

It’s been 95 years since Ulysses and Carrie Cooper opened a restaurant to meet the demand for her deep-fried invention: clam cakes. Aunt Carrie’s descendants still turn out these amorphous, golden-crisp, doughnut-type balls filled with tender clam bits. They’re Rhode Island’s number-one comfort food: a meal in their own right

New England Today

Massachusetts Dining by the Water

Through some magic of architecture, the dining room at The Red Inn promotes the illusion of floating, like the many boats just outside in Provincetown Harbor–or maybe we were seeing things after our pre-lunch bike ride through the dunes to one of the lighthouses. The sea-level view here seems never-ending;

New England Traveler

Bobette’s Takeout

Best Chowder ChoiceChoose mussel chowder or other flavor-graced bowls, such as “Connecticut Clams Casino Chowder,” “Drunk Tomato Tortellini,” “Sweet to Heat Chili,” and cream of portobello mushroom soup. Add sandwiches and salads.

Brewster Fish House

Locals told us about the Brewster Fish House, a Cape Cod gem that has recently seen a change of chefs. Indulge in the fried-seafood options—clams, oysters, scallops, or calamari. Whichever you choose, it’s fresh from local waters, and the kitchen respects its handy source of ingredients. Get there early and

Bridgeman’s

Brodetto was originally a stew made from whatever catch Italian fishermen couldn’t sell. Next to such simple fare, the luscious brodetto served here ($22.95)—full of mussels, clams, shrimp, and fish in a fragrant tomato sauce over squidink pasta—is a cathedral beside a country chapel. It’s a rustic and hearty seafood

Champlin’s Seafood Deck

Besides “basic” stuffies, these folks also offer “casino stuffies” with bacon and “Portuguese stuffies” with chourico and a hint of green pepper.–Yankee Magazine, May/June 2011In Galilee and Point Judith, the big-cahuna seafood shacks; don’t miss the “stuffies” (stuffed clams).–Yankee Magazine, July/August 2011

Essex River Basin Adventures

Best Saltwater KayakingThe web of estuaries in Essex Marsh, an hour north of Boston on Cape Ann, leads to protected bays and the back side of Crane Beach. These tidal flats are home to thousands of littleneck clams, your entree of choice at nearby Woodman’s seafood restaurant (133 Main St.;

Evelyn’s Drive-In

Our smallest state knows a thing or two about clams, especially “stuffies,” and this place treats them well. Boaters of all types pull in and tie up for lunch and dinner here on Nannaquaket Pond.Yankee Magazine, May/June 2010

Farmer Brown’s Farm Stand

Farmer Bob Brown and his wife, Kathy, have found their true calling in the chowder they serve at this year-round market. It’s a thick, stick-to-your-ribs style, supremely creamy, but fresh and brimming with clams.–Yankee Magazine, May/June 2011

Flo’s Clam Shack

Local surfers and beachgoers have long known that few things surpass the fried clams here, across from Newport’s Easton’s Beach—hot and crispy on the outside, sweet and briny inside.–Yankee Magazine, May/June 2010

George’s of Galilee

In Galilee and Point Judith, the big-cahuna seafood shacks; don’t miss the “stuffies” (stuffed clams).–Yankee Magazine, July/August, 2011

Harwich Shellfish Permit

Best DIY ClambakeWith 15 different areas, each on its own tide schedule, Harwich is tops for a do-it-yourself feast. The town offers a $15 one-day shellfish permit, plus good deals on season-long family permits. Digging is easy–the town annually reseeds its beds with 2 million baby clams.

Iggy’s

In Galilee and Point Judith, the big-cahuna seafood shacks; don’t miss the “stuffies” (stuffed clams).–Yankee Magazine, July/August, 2011

Ipswich-Essex Explorer

To The Beach!Both wallet- and eco-friendly, this inexpensive (and frequent) shuttle bus from the Ipswich Train Station parking lot connects all the dots in these maritime towns–from fried clams at Woodman’s of Essex to the broad sands of Crane Beach.

J. T. Farnham’s

There’s a lot of competition for fried clams in this neck of the woods, but hyper-fresh seafood, lack of pretense, and an Essex Salt Marsh location make us opt for this side of the street.–Yankee Magazine, May/June 2010It’s not strictly necessary, but a slight sunburn and some post–Crane Beach sand

Kelly’s

For a place that branded itself on its meat, Kelly’s does surprisingly well with seafood. We found a sprightly, creamy broth, rich in potatoes; it’s a bit lighter on the clams, but fully aromatic and delicious. Locations in Allston, Danvers, Medford, Natick, Revere (where it all began), and Saugus.–Yankee Magazine,

Mac’s Shack

Best Casual FishThe fryolator turns out the usual fish-and-chips, fried clams, and oysters at this popular casual spot, but the chefs also spotlight the local catch with sushi, a raw bar of local bivalves, and entrees such as cracker-crusted bluefish and wine-poached cod.Best Cape SushiNothing showcases the impeccably fresh local

Markey s Lobster Pool

Owner Tom Markey presides over the deep-fryers and steamers, cooking up fresh lobsters, clams, scallops, shrimp, and haddock since 1971. Bring your fiercest appetite and dine on a deck over the tidal Blackwater River, where you’ll spot locals digging for clams. You don’t have to abstain in winter: open Friday

Mike’s Kitchen

Just Like Mom’sMike’s food–calamari, polenta with sausages, stuffed artichokes–is simple Italian that will keep you coming back for more. There’s no sign, because it’s tucked inside a VFW hall, so look for VFW Post 2396 and follow the garlic. Hours can be irregular, so call ahead. Mike Lepizzera has been

Naked Oyster Bistro & Bar

Oysters and clams farmed in Barnstable Harbor off Cape Cod Bay provide the basics for this stylish raw bar and bistro. True to the name, you can order oysters on the half shell with no more adornment than the natural juices. The owner prefers hers with flying-fish roe for a

No Name Restaurant

No Name Restaurant

No Name Restaurant opened in 1917, and the name has been the same from day one. The original owner, Nick Contos, was asked by the local fishermen what he called the place and Nick would answer, “No name, come eat!” Since then, the Contos family has offered fresh seafood at

Penny Lane Pub

Penny Lane Pub

English-style fare with light options (pear salad and gorgonzola!) and a neighborhood atmosphere.–Yankee Magazine, March/April 2012WINE AND ROSES:What used to be Joe’s Diner in a nondescript shingle-sided building has blossomed into Martin and Karen Cappiello’s Wine and Roses, an Old Saybrook surprise. Bold menu specialties have raised eyebrows here in

Point Judith Salt Pond

Pop into Benny’s (688 Kingstown Road, Wakefield) to purchase a metal rake, a plastic pail, and your $11 tourist shellfishing license if you’re from out of state, and you’ll have everything you need to harvest your own clams for two weeks. An hour before low tide, set out into the

Rendezvous

Best Neighborhood RestaurantIf only every enclave could have a place like this. The menu takes its inspiration from the cuisines of the western Mediterranean, but owner Steve Johnson buys most of his produce, fish, and even meat from people he considers neighbors. Plates such as crispy roasted chicken with

Sea Swirl Seafood Restaurant and Ice Cream

Sea Swirl Seafood Restaurant and Ice Cream

Celebrating 25 years! Featured in the New York Times & The Boston Globe “Sea Swirl is another classic of its kind, that sidelines great pints of fried clams,” – The Boston Globe. Visited by Rachael Ray of the Food Network Channel’s $40 A Day. Fresh seafood, burgers, fries, chowder

Swan Pond River

Best Half-Day On Cape CodEnjoy a box of perfect fried clams from the back deck of Kream ‘N Kone, overlooking the Swan Pond River. Then cross the street to rent a kayak for a leisurely 90-minute paddle, either downriver to the Nantucket Sound beach or upriver to see the herons,

The Commons Lunch

Commons’ stuffies come in heaping portions–a bit spicy, with lots of clams, and both regular sausage and chourico, keeping the dish moist and meaty.–Yankee Magazine, May/June 2011

The Lobster Pool Restaurant

Best Lobster With SunsetThis quintessential seafood-in-the-rough establishment not only offers great fish and shellfish, but also features a fabulous westward view over Folly Cove. That makes it perfect for cracking a crustacean just as the sun goes down. There’s no charge for bringing your own wine or beer. When out-of-towners

The Place

They arrive at your table in a bath of buttery cocktail sauce, still on a grill grate, straight off the wood fire. Instantly you understand why folks have been pulling off Route 1 to savor roasted littlenecks here since 1971. Actually, this casual, seasonal clambake restaurant’s origins stretch back to

Thurston’s Lobster Pound

End of the road, end of the earth: Look for mountain views, bluebloods, bluehairs, and swarms of fishing boats.–Yankee Magazine, May/June 2011Thurston’s is tops for off-the-boat-fresh lobster on Mount Desert Island.–Yankee Magazine, May/June 2012The classic Maine lobster pound is a no-frills eatery where you can usually select your own lobster.

Ventuno

Best Island ItalianIf Nantucket were an Italian island, the food might taste something like what Ventuno serves every night. Cape Cod clams become spaghetti alla vongele with the addition of enough garlic. Wild halibut meets locally grown green spring veggies to become merluzzo alla vignarola.

Woodman’s of Essex

Woodman’s of Essex

Woodman’s of Essex is THE place to go for fried clams. Woodman’s is the place where the first clam was fried – on July 3, 1916. Lawrence “Chubby” Woodman started the delicious tradition and today, 3rd and 3th generation Woodman’s are still serving up fried clams, lobster rolls, onion rings,

Woods Hole Science Aquarium

The aquarium at the Woods Hole research center not only displays a wide range of sea creatures but even features a touch tank where you and the kids can get tactile with lobsters, tautogs, clams, spider crabs, starfish, hermit crabs, and horseshoe crabs. Free admission. BEST AQUARIUM TOUCH TANK.

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